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Trey McIntyre Project to Reduce Dance

Gone to multimedia

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Starting Tuesday, July 1, Trey McIntyre Project will take a turn in a "bold new creative direction"--one that involves less dancing.

One of the City of Trees' past cultural ambassadors, TMP has called Boise home since 2008, three years after it was founded. It's known for its accessible contemporary dance works, notably "The Sun Road," "Arrantza," "The Unkindness of Ravens" and, most recently, "Mercury Half-Life."

But beginning in mid-2014, the troupe will no longer be a full-time dance company, as co-founder and artistic director Trey McIntyre pursues adventures in other media, including film, photography and lecturing. McIntyre will continue to work in dance, though current company dancers will be contracted for work on a freelance basis.

"The dance portion of it moves to a model a lot like what it was when we were a summer touring company. It was more of an incubation period," McIntyre said.

Boise Mayor Dave Bieter expressed his optimism for TMP's new direction.

"I'm sure TMP's future will be as thrilling as its past," he wrote in a statement.

Expanding McIntyre's vision will come at a cost to TMP as an organization, however. Hiring dancers for one-off performances means that TMP will cut jobs, though representatives of TMP declined to indicate how many staff positions would be lost--or when.

"Production staff is becoming a little bit unnecessary. We won't be bringing shows weekly around the country," said TMP Chief Strategy Officer Caty Solace.

Solace said TMP is coordinating with similar organizations to place laid-off staff.

With TMP's dance obligations scaled back, McIntyre said the 2014-15 season will include work on two documentaries, including Ma Maison, which chronicles TMP's longtime collaboration with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band in New Orleans, and an as-yet untitled documentary about TMP's first decade.

Beyond documentary filmmaking, McIntyre will also delve into multimedia presentations, beginning with an engagement at the Artosphere in Fayetteville, Ark., which will include a screening of McIntyre-produced films, lectures and an exhibition of his photographs.

McIntyre will continue to work with the Boise School District to bring dance presentations and education to area classrooms.

"We're ... making sure the engagement work we've done here in Boise is continued. Our partnership with Boise School District is something we'll continue to fulfill," said Solace.