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November 27, 2018: What to Know

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BINGO BARNES
  • Bingo Barnes
  • Three American soldiers were killed early today by a roadside bomb near Ghazni, Afghanistan. Three other soldiers and an American contractor were wounded. The New York Times says it was the deadliest attack on American service members in Afghanistan this year, raising the number of U.S. troops killed there in 2018 to 13.
  • Special counsel Robert Mueller says Paul Manafort repeatedly lied to federal investigators in violation of a plea agreement he signed two months ago. The Washington Post reports that Mueller says Manafort's "crimes and lies" relieves prosecutors of all promises they made to him in their investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.`

  • First daughter Ivanka Trump and Apple CEO Tim Cook will visit schools in the Canyon County community of Wilder today. A White House representative said Apple has been working with Trump and the White House to highlight computer sciences and best practices for STEM in public schools. The Idaho Press reports that Wilder was the only school district in Idaho to receive an Apple grant in 2016, which donated an iPad to every student and teacher in the district.

  • The BBC reports that the World Meteorological Organization says there's a 75-80 percent chance of an El Nino weather system forming in the Pacific Ocean within three months. El Nino usually means warmer, drier air during the winter months in the Pacific Northwest U.S., but it has also been linked to floods in South America.

  • The Gotham Awards, honoring under-the-radar independent films, were doled out in New York City last night. Variety says that the western drama The Rider won best picture. Ethan Hawke won Best Actor for First Reformed and Toni Collette won Best Actress for Hereditary. A special ensemble award was given to the cast of The Favourite, including Olivia Colman, Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz.

  • First Lady Melania Trump unveiled this year's White House Christmas decorations on Monday, with the theme "American Treasures." The color red plays a significant role: more than 14,000 red ornaments hang from 29 Christmas trees; plus 40 red topiary trees line the East Colonnade of the White House. Critics have not been kind. Vanity Fair calls the display a "touch of menace." And Elle likens the decorations to Stephen King's horror novel The Shining.