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No Snowflakes at Women's March on Idaho

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- Thousands of people attended the Women's March on Idaho. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • Thousands of people attended the Women's March on Idaho.
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- Elizabeth James' sign spoke to her. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • Elizabeth James' sign spoke to her.
housands of people, gathered in front of the Idaho State Capitol as part of the Women's March on Idaho—one of hundreds of similar protest marches happening around the world following the Jan. 20 inauguration of President Donald Trump—to show lawmakers, the public and each other they're serious about issues from workplace equality and health care to solidarity with minorities.

The rally was a time of discovery for some. Elizabeth James picked up a poster from under the replica of the Liberty Bell at the Capitol. The poster read, "Keep Your Tiny Hands Off My Pussy."

"I found it and it spoke to my heart," James said. "I just want to be able to do what I want with my body, and I don't want a man to tell me what to do."

- (L-R): Mary Ellen Gallagher, Jennifer Oxley and Susannah Oxley proudly sport pink pussy hats. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • (L-R): Mary Ellen Gallagher, Jennifer Oxley and Susannah Oxley proudly sport pink pussy hats.
President Trump was an inescapable presence at the rally. Many of the protesters' signs referenced statements he made during his campaign, including when he said women pursuing abortions should be "punished," and the leaked audio of the president bragging about grabbing women "by the pussy."

Along with carrying signs and even puppets, hundreds of the Women's March on Idaho attendees "pink pussy" hats, many of which were knitted by a group of women led by Marty Durand. Mary Ellen Gallagher; her daughter, Jennifer Oxley; and her granddaughter, Susannah Oxley, each wore one. Gallagher responded to the suggestion by some that the word pussy is distasteful, saying, "When Trump made it part of the conversation, we needed to respond."

"My 67-year-old mother made us these hats," Jennifer said.

- (L-R): Sarah Allman and Barb Blakesley. "We feel bad for her being married to Trump," Blakesley said. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • (L-R): Sarah Allman and Barb Blakesley. "We feel bad for her being married to Trump," Blakesley said.
The march was spearheaded by local organization People for Unity.

Blaine County School District Trustee Rob Clayton drove from central Idaho Jan. 20 to attend an education program at Boise State University—he brought his daughters with him to join the march.

"I came for [the Boise State event] and brought my two older daughters. It's once in a lifetime—you'd better go," he said. "I find it a remarkable instance of pure public feeling. The system of democracy that we have will prevail. Freedom is strong."

After a round of speeches, the crowd slowly moved south on Eighth Street, turned east on Main Street and regrouped in front of Boise City Hall to hear from leaders who stressed unity. Rep. Melissa Wintrow said the ties that bind women are stronger than the forces distinguishing and dividing them.

"There are too many walls between us, and we must tear them down with a wrecking ball," Wintrow said.

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