Music » Music Reviews

Musical Madness at Treefort 2018

by

Ballet Idaho performed with Tispur at Boise Contemporary Theater. - BRIAN MILLAR
  • Brian Millar
  • Ballet Idaho performed with Tispur at Boise Contemporary Theater.

Tispur and Ballet Idaho: Boise Contemporary Theater, March 22

Boise-based Tispur and local dance company Ballet Idaho delivered a chilling performance on the second night of Treefort Music Fest. Tispur's dreamy vocals paired with woodwind elements that put the audience in a trance. The deep sound of the cello mixed with the loftiness of violins combined to create the feeling of being lost in a misty, fairy-tale wood. As the music spun out, Ballet Idaho dancers writhed across the stage, conveying pain and confusion as they met and separated.

The Districts warmed the crowd up for Twin Peaks March 22. - BRIAN MILLAR
  • Brian Millar
  • The Districts warmed the crowd up for Twin Peaks March 22.


Sparks practically flew at the high-energy Twin Peaks concert March 22. - BRIAN MILLAR
  • Brian Millar
  • Sparks practically flew at the high-energy Twin Peaks concert March 22.
The Districts: El Korah Shrine, March 22

The Districts, which opened for the Chicago-based band Twin Peaks, offered up music reminiscent of broody, angsty youth. Their nostalgic vocals recalled those of groups like Dexys Midnight Runners and The Killers, with vocalists belting lyrics like, “Why does it taste like salt?” to describe the sour taste of 

regret after giving someone a second chance.


Twin Peaks: El Korah Shrine, March 22

Indie-rock band Twin Peaks filled El Korah Shrine with so much energy Thursday night that the room buzzed louder than the speakers. The group was dressed like an ‘80s snapshot—think “I’ma take your grandpa’s style” from the Macklemore and Ryan Lewis song “Thrift Shop”—and its music had a vintage, blues-pop vibe with twangy lyrics like, “It only takes a little to get along” and “In a little while, I’ll be gone,” followed by anthemic refrains. That particular song, “Butterfly,” came across as a testament to the brevity of life and underscored the importance of living in the present, making the high-energy performance that much more poignant.


The Seshen's Lalin St. Juste mesmerized the crowd at Humpin' Hannah's. - BRIAN MILLAR
  • Brian Millar
  • The Seshen's Lalin St. Juste mesmerized the crowd at Humpin' Hannah's.

Alien Boy: Linen Building, March 22

Hailing from Portland, Oregon, the self-identified “gay goth band” Alien Boy mixes adolescent angst and modern-day romance. Its punk rock sound nodded to old school, early-’90s Green Day, and electric guitar riffs injected energy into the already high-spirited lyrics. Alien Boy’s music left the Linen Building audience exuberant, eager to bust out old band t-shirts and dig out favorite forgotten CDs.


The Seshen: Humpin’ Hannah’s, March 23

The Seshen—an R&B, electro-pop group from the San Francisco Bay Area—has performed at Treefort in years past, impressing crowds enough to earn a return spot. Lead vocalist Lalin St. Juste sent the crowd into a dream-state with her soft voice, then amped up the vocal power to keep the audience going with spontaneous dance numbers. Her layered vocals on their “Flames and Figures” were comparable to the textured music of Solange Knowles, while the experimental electro-beats and popping bass in the background recalled FKA Twigs.


Princess Nokia's rapped about a popular video game during her March 25 performance. - BRIAN MILLAR
  • Brian Millar
  • Princess Nokia's rapped about a popular video game during her March 25 performance.

Princess Nokia: El Korah Shrine, March 25

Princess Nokia filled the house at El Korah Shrine on the last night of Treefort. The 25-year-old hip-hop artist got the crowd going with one of her hit songs, “Kitana,” which features repetitive rap verses about the popular video game, Mortal Kombat: “Kitana, Kitana, Kitana, Kitana / Mortal Kombat, I’ll see you manana!” Nokia ended the show with a slow, romantic song that created an intimate moment with the audience. When she finished singing, she thanked Treefort and the onlookers and stepped off the stage, but the crowd wasn’t ready to let her go, and chants of “NO-KI-A! NO-KI-A! NO-KI-A!” soon filled the room. The show was a solid end to a jam-packed weekend, and fulfilled what was no doubt its purpose: building just enough hype to encourage crowds to jump on Early Bird passes for next year.