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Moving Day Is Right Around the Corner for Central Addition Homes

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SHANNON HELLER
  • Shannon Heller
The next chapter is about to be written for Boise's Central Addition, once home to some of Idaho's most prominent citizens but recently home to historic buildings many feared would be destroyed. A handful of the homes will be spared the wrecking ball; instead, being moved to give way to new apartments, condominiums and retail.

Josh Unger and fiancée Jenaleigh Kiebert are new owners to one of those landmarks—the Fowler Home—said they're excited to get going with a renovation of the house, but only after it rolls away from the Central Addition to its new home-away-from-home in Boise's North End. 

“We want to restore the house to how it was in the 1800s,” Unger said. “It’s a huge project. We don’t know how long it’s going to take.”

Inside the "Fowler House" - SHANNON HELLER
  • Shannon Heller
  • Inside the "Fowler House"
A few other structures were also auctioned off to Boise citizens and will be moved to their new locations beginning next week. California-based Local Construct—which owns the property and is developing the mixed-use project "The Roost" that will begin rising later this year—is assisting in the cost of moving, but restoration is solely on the buyers of the houses.

“It’s amazing how helpful [Local Construct] has been,” Unger said.

Boise Weekly joined Unger in one of the final walkthroughs of the Fowler House at its current site, where he pointed out some of its highlights.

“The woodwork’s never been painted. Almost everything’s original, including the hardware,” he said, fiddling with the latches on one of the doors to the kitchen. Unger added that keeping the house intact, in order to roll it through the streets of Boise, is a daunting challenge.

“Restoration is not going to be an easy task for us,”he said, placing his hand on one of the still-intact wooden door frames.

“Finding the correct pieces to maintain the house’s authenticity is going to be tough. They don’t sell frames like this anymore, so if we need another piece, milling it up will be difficult.”