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March For Science Fills Idaho Capitol on Earth Day, Record Exchange Celebrates 10th Record Store Day

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- Thousands of people attended the Idaho March for Science. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • Thousands of people attended the Idaho March for Science.
- Demonstrators at the Idaho March for Science got creative with their signs. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • Demonstrators at the Idaho March for Science got creative with their signs.
Thousands of Idahoans took to the Statehouse steps on Earth Day, April 22, to show support for science-based policymaking, as well as their displeasure with lawmakers who have spurned it.

"The sciences are being cut back. The sciences are being devalued," said Ray Corbin, carrying a sign that read, "No Science No Beer." He said was a reminder that science has added to or refined nearly every aspect of life.

The Idaho March for Science was one of many across the country defending "the role of science in a new political era." In contrast to science-based initiatives during the Obama administration, President Donald Trump has appointed Scott Pruitt, a climate change denier, head of the Environmental Protection Agency.

In Idaho, climate change education standards have been nixed from the state curriculum, and the anti-vaccination movement continues to gain momentum. Even the theory of evolution continues to be politically, if not scientifically, controversial in some quarters.

Speakers at the Idaho rally included family physicians, environmentalists, engineers and laboratory scientists, who decried the current state of affairs and talked about how the sciences have driven extensive improvements in public health, quality of life, technology and more—and will be needed to address the challenges of the future.



Kari Passack, an attendee at the rally, said she is concerned public trust in the sciences are on the wane and Donald Trump isn't paving the way toward more evidence-based policymaking.

"The climate we have now in the country is increasingly anti-science, especially with the current administration," she said. "Seeing events like this—people are joining together, but I'm very worried about the future."

- The Record Exchange celebrated the 10th annual Record Store Day. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • The Record Exchange celebrated the 10th annual Record Store Day.
On the other end of downtown Boise, Chad Dryden, the communications manager for The Record Exchange was hoping to pick up the new, remastered pressing of Neil Young's album, Decade.

The album is one of approximately 350 new releases and exclusives available for the 10th annual Record Store Day, an event celebrating the role record stores play in cities across the country.

"We've always taken that role seriously," Dryden said. "It's about having a relationship to the community."

The Record Exchange pulled out the stops for RSD, which included hosting a couple of album release parties for local bands. These included a split 7-inch from Toy Zoo and Sick Wish—the latter couldn't make the show because of, well, illness—and Sun Blood Stories, which recently released its new album, It Runs Around the Room With Us.