Rec & Sports » Cards

Keep Your Eye on the Ball

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The bidding occurred as shown in the diagram when Mike Noss and Don Rahe of Twin Falls held these hands at a recent club game. The action of jumping directly to the diamond slam is abrupt, and in this case effective, because 12 tricks are cold if you keep your objective in mind: to score 12 tricks with only one loser. The declarer in this case took his eye off the ball and finessed for the king of diamonds, and ended up going down.

Duplicate bridge rewards overtricks, but just scoring the slam would be almost a top because it's not obvious that everyone in the field will bid the slam. The sure way to 12 tricks is to set up the declarer's hand, so you want to trump 2 clubs. All your other losers are covered by the dummy's high cards, so the play should go: heart ace, club ace, trump a club, trump a heart, trump a club. Now you lead the diamond ace and another diamond and you're bulletproof! There are more gradual ways to bid to the slam, but east's hand is so powerful after his partner's bids that the jump to slam should not attract much criticism.

The club will be serving entrees at the Sunday potluck from the new Greater Tater Cookbook, published as a fundraiser for the Boise Regional next year. With over 300 recipes from local and out-of-state players, and only $10.95.

In last week's column, I reported wins incorrectly. The column should have said that Doug Bullock and his partner won two events in Caldwell, and his partner in both events was Kendra Bridges. Other winners in B flight were Sandra Watson and Jim Poston, winners in C flight include Bob VanEyll and Gary Crupper. Judy Abbett and Margaret Hartley were second in both A and B east-west on Friday.