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June 16, 2017: What to Know

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BINGO BARNES
  • Bingo Barnes
  • In a major reversal from his campaign rhetoric, President Donald Trump now says he won't deport so-called "Dreamers," undocumented immigrants who had come to the U.S. as small children. The New York Times reports immigrants enrolled through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, better known as DACA, will still be eligible to renew every two years and "no work permits will be terminated prior to their current expiration dates."

  • Amazon has announced it would buy Whole Foods Market in a deal valued at $13.7 billion. ABC News reports the Seattle, Wash.-based Amazon will own a fleet of more than 430 Whole Foods stores, including one in Boise. The deal is expected to close sometime later this year.
  • - The Boise River is at its lowest level since March. -  - ZACH HAGADONE
    • Zach Hagadone
    • The Boise River is at its lowest level since March.
    The Boise River is inching lower. As of this morning, the river at Boise's Glenwood Bridge was just over 6,800 cubic feet per second and was about 10.2 feet high, just below the flood stage. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation have been lowering discharges from Lucky Peak Dam this week, bringing the river to its lowest level since March.
  • The Boise Hawks season opener was postponed due to rain Thursday night. That means the Hawks and Spokane Indians will open their respective seasons later this evening in Spokane. The two teams will try to fit in a double-header in Spokane this coming Sunday, June 18. The Hawks home opener is set for next Tuesday, June 20, when Boise will take on the Eugene Emeralds.
    - Meeting Scooby-Doo, Daphne and Shaggy at the Mystery Machine at Universal Studios. -  - FLICKR USER LOREN JAVIER CC BY-ND 2.0
    • Flickr user Loren Javier CC BY-ND 2.0
    • Meeting Scooby-Doo, Daphne and Shaggy at the Mystery Machine at Universal Studios.

  • Finally, Guardians of the Galaxy Director James Gunn has confirmed in a Facebook post that his 2002 film Scooby-Doo had originally been given an R rating by the MPAA, Entertainment Weekly reports. Gunn's first draft of the script was "an edgier film geared toward older kids and adults." The studio ultimately edited out the cleavage of female stars to achieve a PG rating, Gunn wrote.

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