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I Spy and Blahd at the Linen Building

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Psst. You're being watched. Every single day. Every word you say. Every game you play. They'll be watching you. When Sting penned those creepy stalker lyrics decades ago, he could've never imagined the extent to which surveillance would become a part of our daily lives. Whether we're at the ATM, the grocery store, the airport or on the Internet, piles of information are continuously collected and stored about our daily routines and consumer habits. To explore the ramifications of all this spying, the Sun Valley Center for the Arts is opening "I Spy: Surveillance and Security: A Multidisciplinary Project." The exhibit will try to answer the questions, "Is this a good thing or a bad thing?" and "Where do concerns for our safety intersect with our desire for privacy?" In addition to lectures from Frederick Lane on Wednesday, March 10, and John Lehman on Thursday, April 1, the exhibit will also feature four distinctly different contemporary artists: sculptor Deborah Aschheim, installation artist Hasan Elahi and photographers Trevor Paglen and Paul Shambroom. The exhibit opens Friday, Feb. 26, with artists' talks from Aschheim and Elahi at 6 p.m., along with drinks and appetizers from 5:30-7 p.m.

If the thought of Big Brother-themed art creeps you out, truck on over to the Linen Building on Friday, Feb. 26, from 7-9:30 p.m. The exhibit "Bill Blahd Paintings: Artists, Faith, Medicine, Religion," curated by Boise City Public Arts Manager Karen Bubb, features a collection of oil paintings created by Blahd during his five-year retreat from the public eye. Blahd has described his work as taking "a critical view of established social and religious norms." His pieces--bright, mostly realistic portraits with a historical bent--aren't afraid to be a little tongue in cheek. In Portrait of the Performance Artist at Work in His Studio, Blahd depicts a little Dutch boy in knee-high white socks and a solid white tube covering his head, holding a sheep. Zing.