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Day Before Sandy Hook Anniversary, A Call to End Gun Violence on Capitol Steps in Boise

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- Demonstrators wore orange, which they said signified safety and the value of human life. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • Demonstrators wore orange, which they said signified safety and the value of human life.


The demonstrators standing on the Capitol steps the afternoon of Dec. 13 wore orange because it's a safety color, worn by crossing guards and hunters for its high visibility. Now, they said, it signifies the value of human life three years after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School that left 28 people dead.

Speaking before a group of approximately two dozen demonstrators, Boise Democratic Sen. Cherie Buckner-Webb said shootings like the one at Sandy Hook occur too frequently and issued a call to action.

"We are here to show our commitment to do anything necessary to end gun violence," she said.

This year, there have been almost 50,000 incidents of gun violence in the United States that have killed 659 children under the age of 11 and almost 2,500 teenagers, according to gunviolencearchive.org

- Bob Parrish: Keeping guns out of the hands of people on no-fly lists "is a no-brainer." -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • Bob Parrish: Keeping guns out of the hands of people on no-fly lists "is a no-brainer."
The demonstration, hosted by Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America and its parent organization, Everytown for Gun Safety, was a show of solidarity with elected officials and voters interested in reducing the incidence of gun violence in America—and specifically with President Barack Obama, who is considering taking executive action on the issue in the wake of two high-profile mass shootings in Colorado Springs, Colo., and San Bernardino, Calif. It was one of about 100 such shows of solidarity around the country.

One attendee, Bob Parrish, held a sign that read "No Fly No Guns" in reference to Obama's remark in a recent address to the nation that keeping firearms out of the hands of people on so-caled "no-fly" lists could be part of his plan to reduce American gun violence. He said the idea "is a no-brainer."

For Parrish, however, combating violence in America is about more than gun control: It's a web of hot-button issues stemming from ignorance, hate and intolerance, making dialogue about solving America's problems difficult. He said while his sign indicates a plan of action that makes sense to him, others could see it as an attempt to roll back Second Amendment rights.

"The gun lobby is preoccupied with the slippery slope, and this," he said, pointing at his sign, "[looks like] a slippery slope."