Opinion » Note

Covers, Coverage and Changes

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There is much to cover in this week's edition of Boise Weekly, beginning with our 14th annual Cover Art Auction, which went off without a hitch Oct. 15 at The Owyhee ballroom.

Thanks to the artists who took part, the sponsors who helped make it possible and the art lovers who showed up, pocketbooks at the ready, to bid on 52 original works that appeared on the front page of BW. We grossed about $24,000 over the evening, which will be spread between artists, the BW Cover Art Auction Grant and our investigative journalism fund, BW Watchdogs.

Individual artists will receive 30 percent of the proceeds from the sale of their pieces, but that's not the only way the arts community benefits from the cover auction. The Cover Art Auction Grant goes to support projects from local artists throughout the year. Click boiseweekly.com/boise/WEBoiseWeeklyCommunityFund/Page">here to learn more or download an application. Submit proposals to BW at 523 Broad St. by Feb. 12, 2016 at 3 p.m.

In other news, we tackle a wide range of issues in this week's edition, including a case of "how much local favor is too much?" BW News Editor George Prentice explores a case in which the city of Boise rejected a slate of artists who bid on a series of public art projects because they were from out of town.

Staff writer Jessica Murri digs into another possible case of good intentions gone awry. As cold weather approaches, a group of kind-hearted Boiseans are donating tents and other items to the homeless population that has set up camp in Cooper Court downtown. At the same time, some city and shelter officials caution such generosity might actually make the problem worse.

Speaking of being helpful, we published our first-ever Best of Boise map pinpointing some of this year's best-of winners. For more, visit boiseweekly.com/boise/BestofBoise/Page.

Finally, it's with some sadness—but more fondness—that we say goodbye to our columnist John Rember, who is signing off this week after contributing more than 120 pieces over the past two years. We'll miss his wit, rueful humor and wisdom, but we promise he'll be back in the paper someday. Meanwhile, look for some exciting changes to the opinion section.