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City Names Reinvestment Grant Winners

Plus commission openings and a horse show

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Experts disagree on when humans first domesticated the horse--some say 4,000 years ago, some say 6,000, others claim the process started as far back as 10,000 years ago. Suffice to say, bringing horses into our lives has been one of the most important developments in history.

Celebrate all things equine at the Ford Idaho Center Horse Park, where the 28th annual Idaho Horse Expo is set to take place April 18-20. Put on by the Idaho Horse Council, the event covers everything you ever wanted to know about horses and horsemanship: from seminars and classes on all aspects of training, to riding techniques, breed recognition, and care and feeding. There will also be skill demonstrations and competitions each day, showing off some of the best riding and most impressive horses trained by groups ranging from the Boise Pony Club to Ada County Sheriff. Nearly 100 vendors will be on hand throughout the show, plus kids' activities, silent auctions and a horse sale.

The expo runs Friday, April 18, from 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday, April 19, from 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; and Sunday, April 20, from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for seniors at the door. Advance tickets are $8 for adults, $6 for seniors. Youth 12 and under get in free. Go to idahohorsecouncil.com for more info.

Going from horses to two-wheeled steeds, the Lusk Street neighborhood is set to receive new bike racks, paid for with $12,600 from a City of Boise Neighborhood Reinvestment Grant. The bike racks are one of 41 grants to be awarded this year, totaling $288,812. To see more recipients, go to Citydesk on boiseweekly.com.

And speaking of government entities, if you ever thought you'd like to contribute to wildlife conservation beyond writing a check or two, now's your chance.

Gov. C.L. "Butch" Otter is accepting applications for two positions on the Idaho Fish and Game Commission.

To be considered, applicants must be residents of either the southwest or southeast regions of Idaho and be "well informed and interested in wildlife conservation and restoration," according to a news release.

Appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Idaho Senate, Fish and Game commissioners serve four-year terms and meet five times a year: January, March, May, July and November.

For more info, call Ann Beebe in the governor's office at 208-334-2100 or email ann.beebe@gov.idaho.gov. Applications must be emailed or postmarked by May 9.

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