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CDC: Idaho Stop-Smoking Efforts 'Woefully Underfunded'

“It’s time for Idaho to get serious about reducing tobacco use and, thus, tobacco-related death and disease by adequately funding programs to do just that.”

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is out with a new report this morning, roundly criticizing Idaho's smoking cessation efforts, saying they are "woefully underfunded."

In its 2014 edition of a report dubbed "Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs," the CDC recommends that Idaho needs to spend more than $15 million on tobacco control programs, "seven times the amount the state actually sets aside for efforts to help prevent young people from starting to use tobacco and help those already addicted to quit."

The CDC said Idaho generates $73.2 million a year from tobacco settlement dollars and tobacco taxes, yet Project Filter is currently funded with only $2.2 million.

"While we understand there are many competing priorities in any state budget, improving public health by preventing kids from using tobacco and helping adults quit is a proven and worthwhile investment,” said Stacey Satterlee, Idaho government relations director for the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. “It’s time for Idaho to get serious about reducing tobacco use and, thus, tobacco-related death and disease by adequately funding programs to do just that.”

In the U.S., tobacco kills 480,000 people each year and costs $289 billion annually in health care costs and lost productivity.

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