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BLM Battles Three Fires West of Boise

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The Mile Marker 43 Highway 52 fire is causing a little more trouble due to steep and rocky terrain. At 10,070 acres, there is currently no estimated time of containment. - BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • The Mile Marker 43 Highway 52 fire is causing a little more trouble due to steep and rocky terrain. At 10,070 acres, there is currently no estimated time of containment.

Three fires sparked in the sage brush and grasslands west of Boise June 25. The Griffy Fire sparked four miles north of Murphy and burned 242 acres before it was contained at 10 this morning. The fire is expected to be fully controlled by 6 p.m. this evening.

The South Slope Fire burned 150 acres of grass and brush throughout the night three miles south of Emmett, scorching BLM and private land, but it's expected to be contained by 2 p.m. this afternoon.

The South Slope Fire burned 150 acres three miles south of Emmett. Firefighters expect to have it contained by 2 p.m. - BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • The South Slope Fire burned 150 acres three miles south of Emmett. Firefighters expect to have it contained by 2 p.m.
Giving firefighting crews the most trouble, though, is the MM43HWY52 Fire, which sparked before 12:30 p.m. June 25. Burning six miles north of Emmett, the fire has reached more than 10,070 acres. High winds and rugged terrain have helped the fire continue to grow, burning both private and BLM land.;

A burnout operation was executed last night while aerial resources continue to drop buckets of water and fire retardant. Several engines are in place to protect structures and outbuildings. A portion of Highway 52 was closed last night but it has since reopened. Hand crews, engines, dozers, water tenders, helicopters and air tankers are fighting the fire. There's no estimated time of containment yet.

According to a news release from the BLM, all three fires were human-caused, but still under investigation. As the summer continues to heat up, grasses and other potential fuels for fire are becoming extremely dry, increasing wildfire risk.