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August 9, 2018: What to Know

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NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
  • National Weather Service
  • The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings for the Treasure Valley, eastern Idaho and sections of the west central mountains, including McCall, for today and Friday, Aug. 10. Today's temperatures in Boise are expected to hover near, or at, the record high of 105 degrees, set back in 1875.

  • Details are still sketchy, but Boise Police took a woman, naked and wielding a knife, into custody early this morning. BPD was summoned to 13th and Myrtle streets just before 1 a.m., where police used a Taser to subdue the suspect and load her into an ambulance. No word yet on her identity, her condition or pending charges.

  • U.S. House Representative Chris Collins (R-New York) was arrested Wednesday and charged with insider trading. The New York Times reports that Collins insists he's innocent and will remain on the ballot this November.

  • Albertsons and Rite Aid have called off their plans to merge. The two mega-retailers announced this past February that they would join forces, but CNBC reports that the deal has been shelved pending what was expected to be a less-than-enthusiastic shareholder vote.

  • Meanwhile, Tribune Media says it's ending its deal to merge with the Sinclair Broadcast Group, and is suing Sinclair for breach of contract. CNN reports that the Federal Communications Commission had questioned whether the pending agreement was in the public interest. Tribune employees were notified that the deal was off in a lengthy early-morning memo from Kern that blasted Sinclair and said Tribune had done "everything it was supposed to do."

  • The biggest names in professional golf tee off today in the last major of the year—the 100th PGA Championship, being played this year at Bellerive Country Club in St. Louis, Missouri.



  • Stargazers in the Northern Hemisphere should get quite a show this weekend when another meteor shower appears overhead. NASA says that the so-called "Perseids" show up about this time each year when the Earth ventures through pieces of debris left behind by an ancient comet. Experts say the best views should come around the time the night nears dawn.