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August 7, 2017: What to Know

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BINGO BARNES
  • Bingo Barnes
  • President Donald Trump says he's keeping his campaign promise to create "wealth and jobs" by pushing for more coal mining on public lands. The New York Times reports that Ryan Zinke, Trump's Secretary of Interior, met with a group of Western governors in June where Zinke "vowed to find a balance between extracting commodities from federal lands and protecting them." The Times says this latest move from the Trump White House "has roiled conservationists and many Democrats, exposing deep divisions about how best to manage the 643 million acres of federally-owned land, most of which is in the West."
  • Another Fox News personality has been suspended: this time, it's Eric Bolling, co-host of the prime-time show, "The Fox News Specialists." NBC News reports that Bolling is being investigated for allegedly texting a lewd photo to multiple female colleagues on several occasions. Bolling's suspension comes in the wake of the departures of former host Bill O'Reilly and Fox News CEO Roger Ailes, amid sexual harassment allegations. And just last month, Fox Business Network host Charles Payne was suspended following an allegation of professional misconduct by a female co-worker.
AIRNOW.GOV
  • airnow.gov
  • Call it smoke, smog or just plain gunk, a blanket of haze is expected to remain over the Treasure Valley for the first half of this week. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a red air quality alert for the Boise metro area this morning, indicating that the air was unhealthy for all people. Indoor and outdoor burning is banned in the Treasure Valley and the DEQ is even encouraging people to limit their driving and time outdoors. The National Weather Service office in Boise says a number of wildfires across the region are continuing to push particulate matter into the atmosphere.

123RF
  • 123rf
  • The Wall Street Journal reports that Tesla aims to sell 430,000 electric cars by the end of 2018 and 10,00 more cars every week after that. But where will they plug in? The Journal says "the current charging infrastructure offers little support for a larger pool of people who have both the income and impetus to buy EVs." The Journal's Christopher Mims writes there is an increased effort to build more charging stations, but "it isn't clear that it's rolling out at anywhere close to the pace automakers anticipate they will sell vehicles."