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Almost 100 Stand with Standing Rock in Front of Boise City Hall

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- Sally Monday, left, drove to Boise from Mountain Home to attend the candlelight vigil. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • Sally Monday, left, drove to Boise from Mountain Home to attend the candlelight vigil.
Sally Monday drove from Mountain Home to Boise to participate in a candlelight vigil supporting protesters at Standing Rock—one of nearly 100 people who gathered Saturday night in front of Boise City Hall. Minutes before the vigil was set to begin, she stood in front of Chase Bank on Idaho Street handing out pamphlets to passersby while holding a huge sign that read, "We Stand with Standing Rock."

"The land, the water—we're trying to keep that safe for our grandkids and great-grandkids," she said. "They can move the pipeline but they can't move the water."

- There were almost 100 people in attendance at the vigil for Standing Rock at Boise City Hall. -  - HARRISON BERRY
  • Harrison Berry
  • There were almost 100 people in attendance at the vigil for Standing Rock at Boise City Hall.
Monday and others turned out in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.7 billion oil pipeline that is set to run from North Dakota to southern Illinois. Native American and environmental groups have staked out a months-long demonstration in Cannonball, N.D., against DAPL, citing grievances on issues including land use, eminent domain, water rights and civil rights. Amid sub-freezing temperatures, police turned water cannons on protesters there Oct. 20, sending dozens to the hospital.

"Everybody needs to know about the brutality," Monday said.

Demonstrators in Boise held signs bearing slogans about water, the environment and police brutality, while several held a ceremonial dance near the benches in front of Boise City Hall. Among them was Deb Coates, who wanted to express solidarity with self-described "water protectors" in North Dakota blocking DAPL.

"We feel like if we could go to Standing Rock in North Dakota, we would," she said. "We want to stand up for the people that need all of us."

Ophelia Ramirez and Peter Kuhlman said they were planning to drive to North Dakota in the coming week. They stood before a plastic bin with a sign that read, "Supplies for Standing Rock," collecting winter gear for protesters in Cannonball. The most important items, she said, were wool sweaters, blankets and socks, winter coats and gloves. For Ramirez, the Standing Rock protests have galvanized her feelings about the relationships between business, the government and Native American tribes. She has been following them since September.

"My core issue is: These are tribal lands," she said. "It's about respect."