TIFF 2014: The Extraordinary 'Theory of Everything'

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Wow. 

The first thing you should know about The Theory of Everything is that it's one of the best films of the year and is certain to be a Best Picture nominee. 

The next thing you should know is that the film's theme is literally universal, reminding us that looking for the stars in one another's eyes can unlock many of the universe's mysteries.

The Theory of Everything is the true story of mathematician, physicist and author Stephen Hawking but not the severely disabled, wheelchair-bound, voiceless Hawking of today. The Theory of Everything introduces us to a young Hawking, played in a show-stopping performance by Eddie Redmayne, as a strapping young Cambridge student who falls deeply in love with fellow student Jane Wilde (Felicity Jones). Almost as soon as their love blooms, Hawking is told that his autoimmune disorder will progress and is given two years to live—that was in the early '60s. Three children and several decades later, Hawking is still here and, thanks to Jane, educating and challenging mankind to embrace the universe's infinite possibilities.

"A lot of people don't even think about Stephen Hawking's domestic life, much less know that he walked and talked, and they certainly don't know that he fathered children," said producer Lisa Bruce. "When you look deeper into his life, you see so much more than just the genius; you find a father, a husband, and—under it all—an eternal optimist. But for me, the most powerful element of this story was the sense that he would never have achieved what he did without a partner like Jane."

Like other films such as A Beautiful Mind, My Left Foot, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly and even Goodbye, Mr. Chips, The Theory of Everything is one of those rare cinematic treasures that blends beauty and intellect with the true measure of the human experience. I love this film.