Snoop Dogg at Knizzle Factorizzle, Jan. 21

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Image Courtesy of Mlive.com
  • Image Courtesy of Mlive.com
Low expectations are key to seeing the aging icons of your youth. That way you can't be too disappointed if they blow. But more importantly, if they kill it, they kill it that much harder because you were half-expecting them to throw their back out midway through the set.

Snoop Dogg's performance definitely fell into the latter category. The laid-back nature of his persona could easily have failed to transfer from the small-moves closeups of film and video to the larger scope of the stage. But in fact his presence was all the more magnetic, his every shuffle and bob captivating, his every word and gesture imbued with a relaxed confidence that doesn't just lord over a party, it inspires one. Seeing him live makes it easy to understand why Dr. Dre took Snoop under his wing.

And while a performer of Snoop's longevity could easily get by just playing the classics, or refuse them outright to focus on the new material, he found a perfect balance, offering several clipped medleys of early material from Doggystyle and The Doggfather, as well as House of Pain and Tupac covers mixed in with his newer material.

He also brought Warren G. onstage to perform "The Regulator," though it should be noted that there were later allegations of a "false Warren G.," as no one knows what he looks like any more.

Also onstage with Snoop was an elderly gentlemen the audience interpreted to be his father. Was it? Who knows. All that can really be said is that he was a wicked smooth dancer.

Even if the show had blown, it would have been worth it just for his bedazzled microphone.

But that begs the question, how could any performer with the comfortable audacity to sport that mic be anything less than amazing on stage?