PlayStation 3 On "The Move"

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When Sony Computer Entertainment first started to chat about improving the motion-controller scheme for the PlayStation 3, there were skeptics. Compounding it all was the boring name: the Move. That's about as dumb as Microsoft's entry into the same field: the Kinect.

And the Move looked a bit strange as well, a sort of a wand device with a glowing orb at the end. The way the Move works is that the PlayStation Eye can see the movements of the Move and translate them to in-game movements. And it works rather well. The problem is, there aren't a ton of games it can be used with. It doesn't even work with Call of Duty: Black Ops, arguably the biggest first-person shooter of the year.

So, like many innovative products early in their production, what is available for the Move is not much, but what is to follow has the potential to be amazing. Sony Computer Entertainment is working on a first-person shooter that allows players to aim with the Move wand, almost like a pointer. A pistol grip might also be available to add a sense of realism to the experience. And at a demonstration at E3 in 2009, two were in use: one as a sword and the other as the shield during an arena battle. That kind of interactive gameplay could be a reflexive workout of amazing proportions.


Another game recently looked at was the new SingStar Party Pack. SingStar is a karaoke game from Sony but with the Move, it becomes a dance move game as well with players asked to match onscreen movements.

So there are not a lot of games out that utilize it, and many are rather gimmicky right now, but we should begin to see more titles that utilize it in 2011. Once developers have a chance to integrate it better, this could be a remarkable gaming tool. And remember, this works in conjunction with the PlayStation Eye, a camera that is so much better than most USB-based cameras available for the PC. Not only can players use the controller in the game, but the camera can capture players' images and show them on screen as they go through myriad contortions. Talk about an abuse of the cliched 15 minutes of fame.