Miniature Tigers at Neurolux

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I used to be in a new wave band called The Sucker M.C. Jive Turkeys. We wore matching baseball shirts with hand turkeys drawn on them and sang songs with names like "Requiem for the Jumpkick" and "Flight of the Latex Manatee." While consensus on the talent of the group and the wisdom of our name choices was never reached, the one consistent response we received when we played was that it looked like we were having a great time on stage and that it was infectious.

The same could be said of Brooklyn's Miniature Tigers, who played Neurolux last weekend. Their sound is pop in the same way that Burt Bacharach's is: Pleasant and easy to listen to. Their oohs, ahhs and doos were in spectacular order in the back-up vocal department and they certainly set some toes to tapping. And their songs are completely adorable.

But the single thing that sold their performance more than any of their songs was that they were clearly having a ball playing them.

They consistently cracked jokes and invited people from the audience to play the tambourine. Singer Charlie Brand even left the stage to mingle and dance with the audience for the song "Gold Skull." One member of the band played nearly the entire set blindfolded, switching back and forth between guitar and drums. There was no shortage of sour notes, but that only seemed to please the band more as it consistently raised the comedy bar.

The entire show was performed with the ease and humor of friends hanging out at a practice session rather than a highly-lauded up-and-coming band on a national tour. And that attitude radiated into the audience. To be there was to feel wrapped in a cozy blanket of mirth.

It didn't hurt at all that the band sounded great. There are a lot of bands that sound good out there, but not many that are willing to risk blowing it just to see if they can pull off playing blindfolded for a whole set. And those are the ones most worth seeing.