Idaho Predator Derby Canceled on Federal Land

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U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICES
  • U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services

A controversial hunting derby targeting predator species like wolves and coyotes won't happen on federal land after all. 

Bureau of Land Management officials decided earlier this month to allow Idaho's second annual wolf-killing "derby," but the agency changed its mind and decided to cancel the permit allowing the hunt on more than 3 million acres of public land near Salmon.

According to a news release from the Center for Biological Diversity, the cancellation came in response to a lawsuit being prepared by several conservation groups, including the Center for Biological Diversity, Advocates for the West, the Western Watersheds Project and Project Coyote.

The BLM withdrew its blessing for the wolf- and coyote-kill contest before the suit was actually filed. The agency had granted permission for the contest for three days a year, every year for five years, beginning on Jan. 2, 2015.

“We’re so glad that the deadly derby has been canceled this year,” CBD senior attorney Amy Atwood stated in the news release. “These sort of ruthless kill-fests have no place in this century. We intend to pursue every available remedy to stop these horrible contests.”

The hunt would have allowed up to 500 participants in the contest to kill wolves, coyotes and other animals for cash and prizes. During the inaugural event in December 2013, no wolves were killed, but 21 coyotes died during the hunt. The $1,000 prize for killing the largest wolf went unclaimed.