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The Magic of Mozart

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In 1782, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was busy preparing for his wedding, setting up house and making wind-band arrangements of "Abduction" from Il Seraglio--no small feat--when his dad requested that he compose a piece for a family friend who had been elevated to the nobility in Salzburg, Austria. Feeling slightly imposed upon, Mozart busted out a symphony that was to become the famous Symphony No. 35, "Haffner." That's how he rolled. Anyone who is even vaguely familiar with the life of the boy genius knows that this method of composing wasn't entirely unusual for him. And even if you're not familiar with his story, you most certainly are familiar with his music.

Boise Philharmonic is serving up an opportunity to get in the know with its upcoming Magic of Mozart concert. The aforementioned "Haffner" is one of the works that the woodwind quintet will be performing, along with "Sinfonia Concertante for Winds" and "Rondo for Flute." The performance will feature Jeffrey Barker on flute, Erin Voellinger on clarinet, Peter Stempe on oboe, Patty Katucki on bassoon and Philip Kassel on the horn.

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