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Saving Polaroid

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It's been a cultural icon, a public mainstay and an artists' palette, but its days are severely numbered.

In February the Polaroid Corporation announced that it would stop making instant film by the end of the year, rendering hundreds of thousands of cameras stashed in closets and drawers obsolete.

But Polaroid purists refused to let the unique style of photography go gentle into that good night. Instead, they chose to rage.

Soon after the announcement, groups of Polaroid fans came together to create a united effort to save the film, which has been a constant presence in homes around the world since it was introduced in the 1940s.

Savepolaroid.com is the core of that effort. Organizers of the Web site are recruiting fellow Polaroid diehards to contact not only Polaroid Corporation, but also other film manufacturers in an effort to keep the film on the market.

The site also provides a place for photographers to post their latest Polaroid creations, learn the history of the film, share their stories and projects, learn what they can do to help the effort and even buy a Save Polaroid T-shirt.

They're not alone in their quest. Other Web-based campaigns have popped up, including savethepolaroid.com, the Japanese version of Save Polaroid, a Facebook site and three separate online petitions.

If Polaroid Corporation doesn't change its mind, or another manufacturer doesn't buy the rights to make the film, Polaroid has just five months to live.

Check it out for yourself at savepolaroid.com.

—Deanna Darr

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