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Rush Hour 3

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This year was all about the sequels: Bourne, Elizabeth, Pirates, Potter, Saw, Shrek, Spiderman and others all saw their storylines continued with varying amounts of success in 2007. In Rush Hour's third installment, you mostly likely won't have any issues understanding the words that are coming out of either Jackie Chan's or Chris Tucker's mouths, but it doesn't mean you're necessarily going to want to hear them. Although if you were a fan of Tucker's falsetto freakouts and Michael Jackson fixation, and Chan's seemingly accidental martial arts style, then you'll probably be at home watching this one.

Director Brett Ratner (Rush Hour, Rush Hour 2, X-Men: The Last Stand) finds his odd-couple protagonists reunited when detective James Carter (Tucker) assists chief inspector Lee (Chan) in tracking down the attempted assassin of an ambassador under Lee's protection. Their always-action-packed friendship takes them from the streets of Los Angles to the Parisian underground to the top of the Eiffel Tower, where they track a violent man (Hiroyuki Sanada, The Last Samurai) claiming to be Lee's brother.

The humor's a little trite at this point, and the gags are stretched thin, but Ratner still stages a successful action picture. The average fan will probably skew younger since there are some racist jokes, a French babe (Noemie Lenoir) as eye candy and a fair amount of violence.

The stars and director came back, and part three is in the same vein as the first two, so go in expecting a Rush Hour experience, and you won't leave disappointed.

The Brothers Solomon

This is one of the worst movies I've seen this year. I feel it's OK to be blunt here because if anyone were to misunderstand my recommendation for this film, rent it, and be as disappointed as I was, I would feel just awful.

In order to make their comatose father proud, John and Dean Solomon (Will Arnett and Will Forte) try desperately to find a woman who will bear a child for them despite their complete social ineptness.

Saturday Night Live cast member Forte wrote the script. I've heard he's entertaining on SNL, but I haven't really watched since Will Ferrell left, so who knows. Then there's director Bob Odenkirk, who's probably best known for helping create HBO's sketch comedy Mr. Show with Bob and David. He's done bit parts in countless movies and TV shows—and they're almost always hilarious. And co-star Will Arnett has been a huge hit on Fox's Arrested Development. So why the flop here?

Perhaps it's just a case of talented people traveling outside of their comfort zones. Forte and Arnett are obviously better on the small screen, and Odenkirk is far more talented in front of, rather than behind, the camera. Most of the fault lies with Forte's script, though. Like a baby's diaper, it stinks.

There are about five funny moments, but in a 90-minute feature, they simply aren't enough and could've been accomplished in a 10-minute YouTube short. These guys have done better before, and surely will in the future, but avoid this bombshell if at all possible.

This video courtesy of Hollywood Video, 590 Broadway Ave., 208-342-6117

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