Opinion » Note

Note July 16, 2008



Twice last week I found myself utterly disappointed with a few of my fellow Boise citizens.

Strike one: Last Tuesday morning I made the environmentally minded (and, frankly, wallet-minded) transportation decision to ride my bicycle to work. It proved to be a poor choice. I locked up my bike on the bike rack in front of the BW offices and went inside. An hour later, I wandered outside to discover that some wanker had jacked my quick-release seat—saddle, post, clamp, light, reflector and all—leaving me with only an empty post hole. My bike isn't fancy, but it is brand new. After dropping $65 on a new seat set-up, I remember why I rode my last hunk of junk for so long. Because nobody gave it a second look. I don't think I could've paid somebody to steal that thing.

Strike two: On two separate occasions last week, I climbed Table Rock from the trail head at the Idaho Penitentiary with a handful of friends and their kids. I climb the hill often, and I always grimace a little at the summit, where trash blows across the flat sandstone and gets tangled up in the sagebrush and rocks. Last week, however, I walked past the overflowing trash can (at this point, the can is barely noticeable, making for what looks more like a trash heap) and followed the kids into the caves on the north side. Among the plastic bottles and bags carelessly left by prior visitors were thousands of shards of glass—some not larger than a quarter, and others the jagged and dangerous edges of broken bottle tops. Someone had defecated in one of the caves, empty beer cans rolled in the wind, and the graffiti, in most places, was a lesson in naughty four-letter words.

On to better news. Today marks the first day of Best of Boise voting. But this year, there are two changes. For the first time, the ballot focuses on only local businesses and every field is write-in, which we think will mean a more accurate and fair voting system. Log onto boiseweekly.com and vote for what you think is best about Boise—from our bikeways to our bars and our dry cleaners to our prescient weather predictors.

—Rachael Daigle


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