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UPDATE: Another Hack Takes Down Netflix, Reddit, Twitter and Others

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Update: Oct. 21, 12:12 p.m.
Another wave of internet outages has caused traffic to lock up on websites including Twitter, Reddit and Netflix, just hours after a cyber attack against DNS provider Dyn caused sites such as Amazon to go dark across half the United States.

The latest attack, which The Atlantic reported around noon Eastern Time, seems focused on the Northeast U.S., with users experiencing outages across Japan, the United Kingdom and northern France.  

Original Post: Oct. 21, 10:25 a.m.
Dyn, one of the nation's largest domain name system (DNS) providers, confirmed a large-scale hack took down more than a dozen major websites early Friday, slowing—and in some cases halting—internet traffic to The New York Times, Twitter, Pandora, Netflix, Pinterest, Reddit, Spotify, PayPal and the PlayStation Network. 

“We have been aggressively mitigating the DDoS attack against our infrastructure,” Scott Hilton, a vice president at Dyn, said in a statement provided to The Atlantic

Additionally, Amazon said it had found—but did not specify—the root cause of DNS problems affecting its East Coast cloud customers. Amazon had said it was looking into an elevated number of errors related to accessing its cloud services in a main East Coast server hub due to DNS issues. By mid-morning, Amazon said the problem "had been resolved and the service is operating normally."


In a report titled "When the Entire Internet Seems to Break at Once," Atlantic reporters Robinson Meyer and Adrienne LaFrance wrote "the assault took the form of a distributed denial-of-service attack (DDoS) on one of the major companies that provides other companies access to DNS."

Hacker News was the first to identify the attack Friday morning and name the sites that were affected. Several sites, including Spotify and GitHub, took to Twitter shortly thereafter to post status updates once the social network was back online. Twitter users quickly pushed the term "DDoS" to top of the site's list of "Trending Topics" in the United States.