Opinion » Note




If you've been following boiseweekly.com for the past 10 days or so, you might have noticed that we've been blogging the bejesus out of every festival we can get our hands on: BW New Media Czar Josh Gross, with an assist from freelancer Marcia Franklin, was trying his best to be omnipresent at SXSW in Austin, Texas, from March 11-March 17; and News Editor George Prentice spent the weekend of March 15-March 17 taking in the flicks at the Sun Valley Film Festival.

This week, all of our roaming reporters have returned home, and we're cranking it up a couple of notches for Boise's own Treefort Music Fest, which kicks off Thursday, March 21, and runs through Sunday, March 24.

In this week's print edition you'll find a special info tab with pages of BW picks and recommendations, but the real action is going to be online, where we'll stretch our digital tentacles across the sea of social media to cover as many facets of the fest as humanly possible.

Find all the pertinent information in the special section at the middle of the paper.

Beyond that, and since this week's extravaganza is the high point of Boise's live music calendar, be sure to delve into Josh Gross' feature piece, starting on Page 11.

While practically everyone enjoys live music of some kind, practically everyone also seems to take it for granted that performers are poor, struggling vagabonds whose art relies on starvation for its sincerity. The reality is that working musicians--whether they're gigging in the bars or performing in a symphony orchestra--are enmeshed in a shadow economy that demands their total commitment but offers them few to no assurances.

Catch-22s abound, and with no real regulation, the legal landscape for small-time musicians would look familiar to the troubadours of the Middle Ages.

It's a fascinating read and ought to give a little perspective for audiences as they enjoy the fruits of their local music scene's labors this week.


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