Arts » Lit

Drinking with Dead Women Writers

Saturday, May 12

by

comment

The United States has produced a long line of great female writers, like Emily Dickinson, Louisa May Alcott, Sylvia Plath and Maya Angelou, to name a few. But historically, female writers were subjugated by their male counterparts, with many forced to use pseudonyms or endure harsh criticism.

"Especially George Eliot," said Elaine Ambrose, co-author of the new book Drinking With Dead Women Writers. "Her real name was Mary Ann Evans, and she went by a man's name because [women] weren't regarded as good writers. Everybody loved the book, but then they found out it was by a woman and there was this big uproar."

Ambrose and Amanda Turner teamed up to commemorate the lives of the women who came before them. On Saturday, May 12, from 3-6 p.m., they will take over Asiago's Restaurant and Wine Bar for a night of libations and a celebration of the release of their new book.

"Amanda and I have been good friends for years," said Ambrose. "We met [at Asiago's] on Dec. 22 to have a glass of Christmas wine, and by the time we finished the bottle, we had the outline for the book."

Turner and Ambrose teamed up to tell the stories of the harrowing journey of women writers in early America.

You can enjoy tasty eats, drinks and the chance to pick the brains of two living female writers at the premiere party. Drinking With Dead Women Writers will be available at the event and at Rediscovered Books and Hyde Park Books.

Comments

Comments are closed.