Treefort Thursday Re-Cap: Changing Worlds From Wolvserpent to The Last Bison

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The Last Bisons Dan Hardesty played some mean slap banjo.
  • Tara Morgan
  • The Last Bison's Dan Hardesty plays some mean slap banjo.

The plan was to see Foxygen, but as I approached the El Korah Shrine at 9 p.m., a bundled line snaking down the block slowly revealed its impressive length. I quickly changed course to the Neurolux, where local doom metal duo Wolvserpent was doing a drawn-out sound check.

Singer and guitarist Blake Green blew on the embers of a sage cigar, sending earthy plumes of incense over the gathering crowd. A menagerie of jungle chirps played on a loop, while Jurassic Park-style thumping noises got progressively louder.

When the duo finally got started, flanked by two pillars topped with animal skulls, and low thuds of bass began to rattle my ankles, I decided doom wasn’t in the cards; I needed something more upbeat.

The Last Bison at the Linen Building was certainly that. The seven-piece, family chamber folk outfit featured a grinning violinist in an Amish-looking, floor-length skirt; an energetic cymbal crasher; a slap banjoist (yes, that exists) and a wailing, pony-tailed lead singer, who belted out songs with religious themes. It was the polar opposite of Wolvserpent, but still wasn’t quite doing it.

The band that finally kicked off Treefort for me with an appropriate level of thunderous energy was the girl-fronted four-piece White Lung at Red Room. Grabbing the rafters, lead singer Mish Way wailed into the microphone as a raucous mosh pit pooled and circled in front of her. It was delightfully raw.

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