Caspian Builds a Lush Wall of Sound at Red Room

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A friend once detailed her theory to me about how, because of fixed production costs, rock music would become the new jazz—an increasingly complex product for connoisseurs—while electronic would continue to dominate modern pop.

That certainly seemed to be the case at Red Room March 7 with Boston post-rockers Caspian.

Local opener Ditch Tiger was a library of polyrhytms and savage math riffs. The band was as reminiscent of Botch as it was hardcore-icon Refused. The vocals were somewhat amelodic, hammering a single note like a drum, letting the rawness of tone fill the space generally occupied by melody. The band isn't fully developed yet, but for local hardcore fans, Ditch Tiger is one to watch.

The middle band, Native from Indiana, is what Ditch Tiger seems to be aiming for. The trick to hardcore isn't creating a massive sound, it's knowing what to leave out. Start with a wall of noise and whittle it away to make something uniquely jagged. Native has mastered that. Blindingly precise riffs moved back and forth between droning mid-tempo grooves and syncopated blasts of overdrive. The band said it had never been to Idaho before. Let's hope it comes back.

The headliner, Caspian, built its wall of sound high with three guitars blasting massive amounts of feedback through delay pedals, but in the most lovely way. The atmosphere was so lush, it felt like aerial footage for a nature documentary as it built up in five-minute crescendos to savagely percussive endings.

"Holy fuck! Awesome," one audience member screamed over and over again when the band reached it's final song.

So Caspian played one more. And when it ended, the cries began anew: "Holy fuck!"

You certainly don't get that from electronic pop.

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