Boise's Black Hunger Gets a Taste of Amanda Hamilton

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Hamiltons The Middle Distance explores almost-familiar forms.
  • Andrew Crisp
  • Artist Amanda Hamilton's The Middle Distance explores almost-familiar forms at the North End's Black Hunger gallery.

At the North End's hideaway arts destination, Black Hunger, artist Amanda Hamilton debuted a slice of a larger body of work, a series called The Middle Distance. on Nov. 3.

Inside, the floor of the gallery was dominated by a boat-shaped brown form resembling a mound of earth, from which small faux plants reached toward the ceiling. A projector stood nearby, tossing an image of river stones and water across the space and onto a large window.

"As people walk through, they can disturb that image," said Hamilton. "A lot of the work is about things being transitory, temporary, porous, the idea that things can change shape."

It was also practical. A large painting that makes up a portion of The Middle Distance couldn't fit on the gallery walls, so the image was set through the projector. It served as a sort of backdrop to the form on the ground.

According to Hamilton, "the middle distance" refers to a phrase once used in arts education to define a space between the foreground and background of a painting. Hamilton said she was always taken by the term—and described it as "the middle of nowhere."

"It's a nonexistent place that's in limbo," she said.

While these two pieces will remain in Boise, the rest of The Middle Distance, including a series of drawings and a two-channel film, is headed to Olson Gallery in St. Paul, Minn.

Hamiltons Black Hunger debut offered a portion of her larger series.
  • Andrew Crisp
  • Hamilton's Black Hunger debut offered a portion of her larger series, called The Middle Distance.

Hamiltons improvised projection of a painting too large to fit.
  • Andrew Crisp
  • Hamilton projected a painting that was too large to fit the space onto a gallery window.

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