Treefort: A Big Rock Finale at Neurolux

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Nicholas Dellfs, the main man behind Death Songs, sanctifies Neurolux.
  • Nicholas Dellfs, the main man behind Death Songs, sanctifies Neurolux.

As the clouds opened at the Main Stage for Of Montreal, a handful of Treefort Music Fest faithful trekked into Neurolux for newly immigrated Boisean Nicholas Dellfs, aka Death Songs.

"Oh man, Treefort Festival is wild," said Delffs. "It's really hot in Boise, Idaho right now. It's like summer."

The band featured Dellfs on acoustic guitar and a friend providing keys. The thoughtful indie set may have been a bit too slow for some fourth-day Treefort folk, but after hours of music the pace was welcome, and the crowd grew toward the end of the performance.

Seattle band Motopony built on Death Songs' momentum, launching into a classic rock-inspired set. The highlight of the performance was a huge rendition of Norman Greenbaum's "Spirit in the Sky."

"This Treefort is going to change your town, Boise," said frontman Daniel Blue. "You ain't never gonna be the same after this shit."

Seattle, Wash. band Motopony waxes philosophical at Treefort.
  • Seattle band Motopony waxes philosophical at Treefort.

As the band's set ended, Blue pulled members of the audience on stage. The final track found the Neurolux at capacity and had the entire floor writhing to the beat. Motopony welcomed fellow Seattle band The Cave Singers as a line queued up outside.

Pete Quirk of The Cave Singers indoctrinates an at-capacity show.
  • Pete Quirk of The Cave Singers indoctrinates an at-capacity show.

Pete Quirk's echoey vocals rung out over complex guitar-heavy tracks. The crowd swayed together in the cave-like Neurolux, as if they were living out Plato's allegory, each an eager philosopher after a redemptive weekend.

"This is the largest crowd we've ever had in Boise," said Quirk. "Thank you."

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