Retweet North Korea and Get Indicted

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The New York Times recently reported on the case of a South Korean man who re-tweeted messages from the official North Korean Twitter account. Park Jung-geun, a 23-year-old photographer, now faces charges for violating a draconic South Korean National Security Law, which prohibits "acts that benefit the enemy" without outlining such acts explicitly.

While some governments go to extreme measures to crack down on crime committed online, other countries like Finland make fast Internet a legal right.

Local attorney and social media guru Lisa McGrath has focused her practice on Internet law. She chatted with Boise Weekly in 2011 about the shifting battlefield of legislating the Internet.

"If you went to my Twitter stream and they had admitted something against me—maybe I checked in on FourSquare—it's all admissible," McGrath said. "Facebook is the number-one place that attorneys are going to for evidence."

McGrath will be included in a forthcoming Boise Weekly feature story on the perils of over-sharing and social media.

Click here for an example of North Korea's fascination with Twitter, somewhat accurately translated by Google: twitter.com/uriminzok

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