Scientists Find Evidence of Cosmos 'Dark Matter'

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The $2 billion particle detector, or AMS, is mounted to the international space stations exterior to gather data.
  • NASA
  • The $2 billion particle detector, or AMS, is mounted to the international space station's exterior to gather data.

It could be the key to unlocking the origins of the universe. But then again it could be, well, nothing.

Scientists from the International Space Station say they may have found the first hints of dark matter, the elusive substance that neither emits nor absorbs light but holds the cosmos together. Of course, it helps if you have a $2 billion cosmic ray detector installed at the space station. The experiment is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy.

At an April 3 briefing, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Samuel Ting said, "Our evidence supports the evidence of dark matter," and "I'm confident with enough time we'll solve this."

The Wall Street Journal reports that experiments identified a "new particle" that is the "building block" of dark matter. The 7.5-ton cosmic ray detector found thousands of exotic particles called positrons that scientists say are likely debris from dark matter particles.

"It took us 18 years to build this experiment," said Ting.

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