Judge Blocks Pennsylvania Voter ID Law



As the country moves closer to the Nov. 6 presidential elections, state judiciaries are considering challenges to strict laws that require voters to present personal identification before casting a ballot.

Today, a Pennsylvania judge cited "disenfranchisement" concerns as the reason for barring the state from enforcing its voter ID requirement.

During two days of testimony, the six-month-old law was challenged by a group including the Homeless Advocacy Project, the League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania, the NAACP and a group of concerned voters.

Judge Robert Simpson wrote:

Consequently, I am not still convinced in my predictive judgment that there will be no voter disenfranchisement arising out of the Commonwealth’s implementation of a voter identification requirement for purposes of the upcoming election.

However, the court did not rule on the constitutionality of the law.

A federal court in Texas and another panel in Florida struck down similar requirements in August. Idaho's voter ID requirement remains in place, though Idaho citizens can sign an affidavit attesting to their identity in lieu of photo identification.


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