Senate Intelligence Committee, Including Risch, Looking to Plug Security Leaks

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Idaho Republican Sen. Jim Risch isn't shy when it comes to talking about his U.S. Senate committee assignments, including energy and natural resources, ethics and foreign relations. But he's also a member of the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and rarely speaks of what is discussed behind closed doors.

But Risch and his 14 Senate colleagues on the committee have crafted what they call "an anti-leaking bill" that could limit intelligence officials' contact with reporters. The measure comes in the wake of an FBI investigation into a number of high-profile security leaks that may have come out of the White House, the Pentagon, the National Security Agency or the Central Intelligence Agency.

Feds are hunting for sources that, according to the New York Times, leaked to the media information on the Stuxnet cyber attack in Iran, a foiled terrorist plot in Yemen, and the so-called "kill list"—a once-secret list of suspected terrorists marked for drone strikes.

The Senate Intelligence Committee is looking for new measures that would, if adopted, require notification of Congress when intelligence information is disclosed to the public, expand use of polygraph testing, prohibit cleared personnel from serving as media commentators, and create a short list of designated intelligence community officials to communicate with the media.

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