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Absurdist Film Festival

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Some people make films to be artistic. Some make them to tell stories. Some make them as the only effective therapy to deal with a world gone mad.

Kelly Broich, the man behind American Films, says films from directors of the last variety are the kind you can expect to see at the inaugural Absurdist Film Festival on Saturday, Nov. 6.

"We've tried to alienate and turn people off as much as possible," says Broich.

When he found other filmmakers with a similar philosophy, he decided it would be interesting to put on a festival. The festival, which should run about three hours with an intermission, includes films made by a homeless hot dog vendor and several mentally ill people.

"I'd say everyone in this film festival has issues," says Broich.

Those "issues" were problematic for Brioche in an organizational sense. The filmmakers were scattered, anti-social and in one case, dead. Broich says one of the films, Goat Worship, has been consistently loaded and removed from Youtube for years, just to annoy people.

But if anything, Broich feels that social dysfunction only adds to the films' artistic merit.

"It's about trying to find meaning in a meaningless world," he says.

As far as artistic statements go, that one is about as far from absurd as it comes. The festival happens Saturday, Nov. 6, at Visual Arts Collective, and all proceeds will be donated to the fund to help Gina Gregerson, who lost her home to a fire on Oct. 23. Gregerson also operated an animal rehabilitation facility at her home, which was also lost in the fire.