Opinion » Note

A Lively Week

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As philosopher Carl Jung famously said, "There is no coming to consciousness without pain." In other words, "Being a person is hard."

Apparently, we were in a thinky mood, as several stories in this edition of Boise Weekly have to do with life and how we live it.

First, on Page 6, BW News Editor George Prentice digs into how people who have struggled with addiction find help in "safe and sober" housing. On paper, the practice of providing a stable environment in which to kick a habit makes sense. However, as Prentice found, Idaho lacks any oversight requirements for such spaces. The result: Too often, "safe and sober" ends up being anything but. Rather, many of these houses turn into for-profit halfway houses. One man wants to change that, however, with a clean living program that lives up to its name.

On Page 8, BW Staff Writer Harrison Berry takes us inside a lifestyle community that typically flies under the radar. Unbeknownst to most Boiseans, more than 100 people gathered at the Riverside Hotel earlier this month to share their experiences with polyamory—the practice of being in a relationship with more than one partner.

Often stigmatized as either "swingers" or polygamists, polyamorists push back against both perceptions. At the Boise convention, attendees talked about "ethical non-monogamy" as an alternative form of relationship that can provide as much physical and emotional well-being—even a rich family life—as monogamy.

On Page 18, Prentice considers the life and times of The Flicks. Boise's beloved indie theater was on the ropes 25 years ago, but securing a rare screening of A River Runs Through It (itself a film about life) put it in the black for the first time and may well have saved it from going dark.

Finally, on Page 19, Berry has a conversation with renowned pollster and political guru Nate Silver, who was in town for Hackfort last month with the crew of his popular blog FiveThirtyEight. In their talk, Berry and Silver touch on the ways polling can give people a clearer understanding of what's going on in the world—which, we would hope, might help ease the pain of consciousness.

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