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A Con For America

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What are the characteristics that set one presidential candidate apart from the others? Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton or John McCain ain't got nothing on Keith Russell Judd: He's the only candidate locked up in federal prison.

But you, lucky Idaho, can vote for him. The—dare we say—longshot candidate filed to be on Idaho's ballot for the nation's top office on March 17, paying the $1,000 fee required if a candidate is not of national prominence.

His name is now listed alongside Clinton and Obama as the state's official Democratic presidential candidates. Judd has also filed as a write-in candidate in several other states, including Kentucky.

He's no stranger to presidential races. According to his ProjectVoteSmart.org profile, he ran for the same office in 1996, 2000 and 2004, as well as mayor of Albuquerque, N.M. in 1993 and 1997, and governor of New Mexico in 1994.

But running the country may prove challenging from inside the Federal Correctional Institute Low Security Facility in Beaumont, Texas. Judd was convicted in 1999 of mailing threatening communications and is scheduled to be released in 2013, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

So, who is this would-be public servant, who lists his nicknames as "Mr. President," "Dark Priest" and "Rusty?" Here's the rundown according to his online profile:

He's a 49-year-old Rastafarian-Christian who was born in Pasadena, Calif. He has apparently held mainly music-oriented jobs including playing bass in the Norman Frasier Band, sound engineer at a night club and salesman at a music store.

His other employment history includes time spent as a quality assurance inspector for the General Electric Aircraft Engine Group, and a contractor for the New York Society of Reproductive Medicine.

The many group affiliations he lists in his profile include the National Rifle Association, Rehabilitation of Homeless Association, Musicians-Entertainment Union and, our favorite, the Federation of Super Heroes.

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